Six Reasons Why We Love Maple

by Kate H. Knapp on February 21, 2014

in Blog, Featured

bacon-pancakes

I’ll let you on a little secret, I was a pancake purist in my youth—I thought hotcakes were too precious to be soaked in syrup, so I instead opted for just a bit of butter and a sprinkling of sugar. I would turn my nose up in dramatic disgust as my family drowned their fluffy flapjacks in that golden liquid. It wasn’t until I moved to New England, with its abundance of maple tapping and sugaring, that I finally understood the true meaning of maple mania. My eyes were opened and now I can’t imagine my pancakes (or bacon!) without that sweet, sappy sauce.

Maple, however, goes far beyond the breakfast table (even though they are clearly soul mates), and we turned to a few of our favorite bloggers for six different ways to make maple a staple in any meal.

1. Maple Bacon Pancakes (pictured above): Since pouring liquid on my pancakes was originally a big no-no, these heavenly hotcakes provide the perfect compromise—the maple syrup and bacon are mixed into the batter—and would have revolutionized my childhood. Also, does it get any better than pancakes on the go? I’m going to have to say no. No, it doesn’t. {From Girl Carnivore}

maplecinalmonds

2. Maple Cinnamon Candied Almonds: When the snacking mood strikes, there’s nothing like a perfect mix of salty and sweet. Just five ingredients (maple syrup, of course), and almonds are transformed into a delightful treat, which are perfect for a party or as a hostess gift. And as an added bonus, your house will be filled with the scent of cinnamon-y goodness while they bake. {From Lark and Linen}

Rhubarb-Maple-Muffins-1

3. Rhubarb Maple Muffins: As the final days of winter are winding down (I’m not listening to you, groundhog!), these muffins are calling my name. The ingenious recipe captures the freshness of spring in every crumbling bite by simply combining the tartness of rhubarb with the sweetness of maple syrup. {From Eat Boutique}

maplesoup

4. Slow Cooker Butternut Squash Soup with Maple Roasted Chickpeas: I’ve been a long-time fan of butternut squash soup, but I’ve never before seen chickpeas as a garnish—let alone chickpeas that are roasted with maple syrup, cinnamon, and brown sugar. This savory soup adds a crunchy bite of fall to every creamy spoonful. And I wholeheartedly approve. {From Two Peas and Their Pod}

Homemade Maple Ice Cream _ GI 365 (1)

5. Homemade Maple Ice Cream: Do you like vanilla ice cream? Then get ready to be swept off your feet for this maple ice cream, which takes the cake (while pairing perfectly with it!) for frozen treats. The maple is the star of this simple dessert, while the texture is absolutely spot-on. Sigh, so many wonderful combinations—starting with apple pie, naturally—yet so little time. {From Gi 365}

maple meringues

6. Maple Cinnamon Meringues with Toasted Almonds: Last, but by no means least, are these light, airy, melt-in-your-mouth meringues. The delicately-decadent treats are like little clouds of maple, cinnamon, and almond heaven, and look far more impressive to make than they actually are. Get ready to wow your loved ones. {From Gourmande in the Kitchen}

Do you have a favorite way to use maple? Share your syrup secrets with us in the comments section below!

Photos taken and styled by Kita, Jacquelyn, Christine, Maria, Kari, and Sylvie.

Eat Boutique discovers the best small batch foods by boutique food makers. We share recipes, maker stories and city guides to eating boutique. We host tasting events and markets for food makers, cookbook authors and food fans. We craft seasonal, regional gift and tasting boxes and sell individual items that you can order in the Eat Boutique Shop. You can also follow us on TwitterFacebookInstagramTumblr and Pinterest.

French-75-03

Kate H. Knapp

Head Recipe Tester & Shop Editor at Eat Boutique
Kate H. Knapp has been cooking since she was stove-high and whisk-strong. She comes from a long line of cooks and bakers, from whom she learned the sweet power of sugar, the thrill of egg whites, the magic of leftovers, and the importance of being fearless in the kitchen. Kate works as the Urbanist Boston City Guide Editor and has recently earned a Masters in Gastronomy. She spends her free time testing recipes, practicing food photography, and reading cookbooks. Her recipe for life is a work in progress—needs a dash more of this and a pinch of that—but she couldn't be happier with her ingredients.

Latest posts by Kate H. Knapp (see all)


ADS SUPPORT THIS BLOG

Previous post:

Next post:

Copyright Eat Boutique 2013. Call us at +1-617-752-1105.

WordPress Admin