Mulled Apple Cider Jelly & Cookbook Giveaway

by Tara Bellucci on November 15, 2012

in Authors, Boutique Businesses, Giveaway

It’s the most, wonderful time, of the year (in my best sing-songy voice)…the Eat Boutique Holiday Market, of course! It is just around the corner (Sunday, December 9!) and to get us all in the Holiday Market spirit we’ll be writing a series of posts about the makers and authors joining us for the event.   Plus, there will be giveaways! Enjoy and see you soon.   —Maggie

Over the past few years, canning has gone beyond grandmas to become a hip new (old) trend. I found my passion for preserving when I started the Boston Food Swap; for Marisa McClellan, it was rediscovering childhood memories of her mom’s jams and jellies.

And lucky for us, Marisa is a friend of Eat Boutique.   We had a lovely summer potluck with her to celebrate the release of her first book, Food in Jars, and we are thrilled she’ll be joining us to sign and sell copies of her book at the Holiday Market.

Marisa has built a career out of her passion, teaching people how to can, sharing her inventive recipes on her wildly popular blog, and now expanding her audience with the new book.

If you have a big farmhouse kitchen and a backyard garden, it’s practically second nature to can. Marisa is the can-evangelist for the rest of us; the urbanites, the small-space dwellers with nary a spare cabinet, the farmer’s market shoppers who want to preserve blueberries by the pint, not the bushel. From her Philadelphia high-rise apartment, Marisa puts up small batches of peaches, pickles, and other preserves and shows us you can can with limited pantry space.

With a friendly tone, clear instructions, and a can-do attitude, Food in Jars is perfect for your first foray into preserving, and full of tasty twists and classic combinations for those who are more experienced. So whether you’re saving the first backyard Romas for a January marinara or savoring the sweet strawberries of summer with a hint of vanilla, Marisa’s got those flavors (and memories) preserved.

Having just returned from a week in Vermont, I turned a quart of fresh-pressed apple cider into Marisa’s fragrant mulled cider jelly, so that the taste of autumn can melt on my toast even after the leaves are gone.

That recipe is below.   Plus, here is your chance to win a giveaway from Eat Boutique: a copy of Food in Jars and a jar of small batch jam from EB!

There are FOUR ways to enter to win. Try all FOUR!

1) Enter once by leaving a comment on this post answering this question: What is the first thing you canned or what do you plan to try first if just getting started? Any funny canning snafus?

2) Enter again (two times could be your charm!) by following @eatboutique  on Twitter and tweeting:  I entered to win @foodinjars cookbook. Marisa will sign her book at @eatboutique Holiday Market on 12/9! More here:  http://bit.ly/SODy78

3) Enter a third time by “liking”  Eat Boutique on Facebook  and leaving a comment on the post that showcases this blog post.

4) Enter a fourth time by subscribing to the Eat Boutique email list at the very end of this post or in the right hand column and leave a message here to say that you did!

All entries must be made by Wednesday, November 21, 2012 at 11:59pm, and a winner will be chosen and notified by Saturday, November 24, 2012. We can only ship to US residents.  There’s not much time so leave your comment now!

Mulled Apple Cider Jelly

By Marisa McClellan, Food in Jars

Makes 2 pints

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups fresh pressed apple cider
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1 packet powdered pectin
  • 1 orange, zested
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp ground cloves

Directions:

  1. Prepare a boiling water bath canner and 3 pint jars and lids.
  2. Measure out the sugar and whisk the powdered pectin into it so that they are fully integrated.
  3. In a large, non-reactive pot, combine apple cider and the pectin-spiked sugar. Add orange zest and spices and bring to a boil and cook, stirring frequently, until the volume in the pot is greatly reduced.
  4. While you continue to stir, clip a candy thermometer to the pot and watch until the pot reaches 220 °F. There will be a great deal of foaming and bubbling before it reaches this point. It should look thick and syrup-y and the bubbles should look glossy.
  5. When jelly is finished cooking, pour it into prepared jars. Wipe rims, apply lids and rings and process in a boiling water canner for ten minutes. Cool, check seals. If they’re good, place jars in a cool, dark place and use within one year.

All photos styled and taken by Tara Bellucci.

Eat Boutique  discovers the best small batch foods by boutique food makers. We share recipes, maker stories and city guides to eating boutique. We host tasting events and markets for food makers, cookbook authors and food fans.  We craft seasonal, regional gift and tasting boxes and sell individual items that you can order in  our new shop.  Sign up to be the first to get tickets for the  Eat Boutique Holiday Market.

Tara Bellucci

Tara Bellucci is a lifelong New Englander who grew up in the kitchen and never left. A founder of the Boston Food Swap, it's her mission to share culinary creations and connect people through the joys of real food. Outside of swapping, Tara writes about décor & design for Apartment Therapy and The Kitchn. See what she’s up to at tarabellucci.com.

Latest posts by Tara Bellucci (see all)


ADS SUPPORT THIS BLOG

  • Joanna

    The first thing I ever canned was the Food in Jars strawberry vanilla jam. Yum!

  • Joanna

    The first thing I ever canned was the Food in Jars strawberry vanilla jam. Yum!

  • Pat

    It has been so many years I can’t remember, but my early canning efforts included rose hip/highbush cranberry syrup, zucchini pickles, and pear mincemeat – all of these while living in Alaska over 35 years ago!

    • Peggy Witter

      Pat, did you by any chance make lingonberry jam? Or pick salmonberries? We just moved from Alaska 2 years ago and I am canning up the last of the lingonberries, highbush cranberries, wild blueberries, and rose hips. it was winter so they stayed frozen on our drive back down to the lower 48. :) (whereabouts did you live? we were in the interior south of fairbanks.)

  • Pat

    It has been so many years I can’t remember, but my early canning efforts included rose hip/highbush cranberry syrup, zucchini pickles, and pear mincemeat – all of these while living in Alaska over 35 years ago!

  • Pat

    OK, I just subscribed :-)

  • Pat

    OK, I just subscribed :-)

  • conchgirl

    First thing I canned was strawberry jam. It came out prety well. As far as snafus go, on more than one occassion did a jam end up being a sauce….

  • conchgirl

    First thing I canned was strawberry jam. It came out prety well. As far as snafus go, on more than one occassion did a jam end up being a sauce….

  • Sarah R.

    The first thing I ever canned was strawberry jam (this past summer!), and I actually used the recipe from Food in Jars. During my last canning escapade, I somehow managed to get water inside one of my jars of peach jam during the processing step. My first thought was to suck the (boiling) water off the top with a straw. That obviously ended with me spitting water all over the counter. And then my brain came back, and I used a spoon to get the rest of the water out. Problem solved.

    • http://www.eatboutique.com Maggie

      “And then my brain came back” I love you. I would SO do that. :-) xox

    • http://www.eatboutique.com Maggie

      “And then my brain came back” I love you. I would SO do that. :-) xox

  • Sarah R.

    The first thing I ever canned was strawberry jam (this past summer!), and I actually used the recipe from Food in Jars. During my last canning escapade, I somehow managed to get water inside one of my jars of peach jam during the processing step. My first thought was to suck the (boiling) water off the top with a straw. That obviously ended with me spitting water all over the counter. And then my brain came back, and I used a spoon to get the rest of the water out. Problem solved.

  • jude

    35 years ago – jam.

  • jude

    35 years ago – jam.

  • Lori

    Many years ago I helped my mom can tomatoes and green beans, but I haven’t attempted canning on my own!

  • Lori

    Many years ago I helped my mom can tomatoes and green beans, but I haven’t attempted canning on my own!

  • Peggy Witter

    The very first thing I canned was my Grandma’s Rose’s limed pickles… trust me it is at least a 2 day process and looking back probably not the best beginner recipe. There was absolutely no help from anyone because I lived several hundred miles from home and was basically a newlywed. Add to that the fact that I never felt comfortable in my mom’s kitchen so cooking/canning was not my thing. However I persevered and they were delicious! 21 years later and I still can!

  • Peggy Witter

    The very first thing I canned was my Grandma’s Rose’s limed pickles… trust me it is at least a 2 day process and looking back probably not the best beginner recipe. There was absolutely no help from anyone because I lived several hundred miles from home and was basically a newlywed. Add to that the fact that I never felt comfortable in my mom’s kitchen so cooking/canning was not my thing. However I persevered and they were delicious! 21 years later and I still can!

  • Peggy Witter

    Just started subscribed via e-mail… oh I am smitten already!

  • Amy W

    The first thing I canned was peach jam, it was a little runny, but I’ve since gotten much better at jam. Would love to win that cookbook.

  • Sharon H.

    First thing canned….tomatoes! That was probably 30 years ago, at least, and I’m still canning them (and other things) :)

  • http://twitter.com/sacatomato sacatomato

    I just discovered you from Food In Jars, subscribed too!

    First thing I canned was plum jam, and it was terrifying. I was very concerned with making someone fall ill. I’ve since become a food safety manager and certified exam administrator as I find the science of food safety and canning pretty interesting. Yikes! Does that mean I’m a geek?! (But at least a safe one ;-)

  • Sally Kennedy

    The first thing I canned was grape jam because my grandmother always made it and it was so delicious – far, far better than store bought! My biggest snafu was once I made apple butter in my crockpot and put in cinnamon sticks as the apples cooked down. I left it overnight and next morning decided to smooth it out using my hand blender, forgetting about the cinnamon sticks! I had to strain it before canning to get out all the pieces of cinnamon bark.

  • Jackie T

    The first thing I canned was Margarita Strawberry Jam. It’s now my least favorite canned thing.

    • http://www.eatboutique.com Maggie

      Hi Jackie! What’s in it? Tequila? xox

  • Ruby

    The first thing I ever canned on my own was tomato sauce. I bought an extra “canning share” with my regular CSA share a few summers ago, made sauce, and canned it all. It turned out pretty good – a little under-salted, but better than the opposite problem, certainly. I gave jars of it to family for Christmas. One person asked if I skipped the water bath because it tasted so fresh – nope, definitely followed the proper canning process, so the success must be all in the excellent tomatoes.

  • Michele

    I made concord-walnut conserve from Eugenia Bone’s Well Preserved as my first water bath canning experiment. It came out more watery than jam but was great as a yogurt or ice cream topping.

  • Ruby

    Just subscribed to your e-mails and confirmed the subscription!

  • Julie

    First time canner this year and the first veggie was tomatoes from my garden. Really no snafus this year – I had one jar that didn’t seal and “puked” out all the ingredients into the canner :) Only one broken jar. Having a great time and love finding new recipes and experimenting! Next on the list, Guinness beer jam :)

  • Michele

    I just subscribed to the mail list as well, for an additional contest entry. Thanks.

  • Emily M

    The first thing I canned was blueberries that we’d picked. Funny snafus? How about pickles that dissolved in their own brine! I also burned a batch of blueberry jam pretty badly, which took my good pot out of commission for quite a while. The happy ending is that it was great mixed with chipotles on barbecued anything!

  • Sue K

    I’m sure the first thing I ever canned was dozens of pints of green beans during one particularly ambitious year of gardening.

  • Kathyinozarks

    I would love to win this book- I just signed up on the right to follow this blog thanks Kathy

  • Kathyinozarks

    I have been canning ever since I can remember and I am in my 60s my now. My mom canned mostly fruits and jams and pickles. I would think one of the first things I canned on my own was fresh fruit like peaches or pears. I am now branching out to meats and mushrooms-I will be canning up lots of venison tomorrow. thanks for the chance to win her book

  • Kathyinozarks

    I do not do facebook, but I am off to tweet thanks again for the giveaway chance

  • ReneeClaire

    The first thing I ever canned on my own were pickles but my summers we spent helping my mom and grandmas can everything from tomato sauce to pears to creamed corn.

  • Ronda RS

    Liked on facebook

  • Ronda RS

    subscribed to email list.

  • Jamie Bass

    First thing I canned/preserved was a hot-pack batch of pickles. I’d taken some classes that were very strict on things like temperature, sanitizing, etc. and exceedingly nervous as a result. For some reason, the tip about not completely sealing the jar when doing the hot water bath, and making sure it was under about an inch or so of water, had gotten through, but not the bit on how to use the metal ring to hold the lid down enough to let air out but not let water in. Hmm. Soon all that was going on was a bath full of watered brine and jars that kept tipping over spilling everything out. Lordy nearly a 3 liters of vinegar remaking and setting the brine was used up before how stupid I was being hit me. They turned out great regardless and now I’m a hot pack pro. :)

  • Robyn

    I can’t remember the first thing I canned! But, it might have been raspberry jam…

  • http://www.facebook.com/ni.damick Nicole Damick

    The first time I ever canned, I made 18 half pints of caramel apple butter, which I had never before tasted. I just had a lot of apples. Turns out I don’t actually *like* apple butter. They made great gifts though!

  • http://www.facebook.com/danielle.l.nielsen Danielle Nielsen

    The first time I canned by myself with no help at all was salsa.

  • Kathleen

    The first thing I canned was blueberry thyme jam.

  • Carrie R

    My first canning adventure was making a peach vanilla jam, and I just started canning this past summer! :)

  • Carrie R

    I am following on Twitter now- @frugalfoodiemom

  • Carrie R

    I liked you on Facebook and posted a link to this post on your page :)

  • Erica

    The first thing I canned was blueberry jam. It is still my favorite food to can and it makes it feel like summer!

  • kelli w

    The first thing I ever canned all by myself (not helping my Grandma as a kid) was seedless blackberry jam. We have a TON of wild blackberries on our property and one year I just decided to figure it out. I bought the blue bible of canning (the Ball Guide to Canning) and got busy. I’ve been canning and freezing ever since. :)

  • kelli w

    I just liked you on fb and posted a link…

  • Lainey B.

    Strawberry jam was the first thing I ever canned made with strawberries picked at an organic u-pick farm back in 1989. I’ve picked berries & made several kinds of jam every summer since. I’m happy to say that I’ve had no canning disasters so far!

  • betty

    The first jam I made was an apricot jam and it was so good.

  • betty

    I Like you on FB

  • Su

    The first thing I made was a rhubarb chutney!

Previous post:

Next post:

Copyright Eat Boutique 2014. Call us at +1-617-752-1105.

WordPress Admin